19:55 

Season 01 Featurettes

Наивно-оптимистичный сайлонский тормоз в ромашках

Women in Pivotal Roles

Mary McDonnell: I’d read Battlestar and I was deeply moved, which I didn’t expect. So to me it was very current and an opportunity to play a female president, which… I’d had a few first ladies and things like that. But never had a female leader, quite in this situation or this stature to be able to go at but also the irony that there was a female leader, who had not the ambition towards that her whole life. So it was a different entry toward evolving leadership. And it was more about destiny, having to accept the mantle rather than to go after something. And I found that really intriguing.

Ronald D. Moore:You know, the original Galactica was just very male-oriented and trying to just sort of even it up and make it more interesting some of the roles naturally just became women to make it a more interesting show. Adama is man and is the leader of the fleet. And I wanted the role of the president, because I wanted to play the civilian versus military sort of tension and it felt natural to make the president a woman as well.

Jamie Bamber: The president is a strong woman with a compassionate…a compassionate bedrock, if you like. I think, that’s what he sees in the president. I think, he sees his mother, who he’s lost, who is perhaps more emotional than his dad ever was. And the president is an emotional woman, and Lee connects with her at that level. But she has element of steel, and she can show resolve, and she can make very very tough decisions.

Mary McDonnell: That’s what’s beautiful about this in a general(?) sense, that there are so many women in it who are very comfortable with themselves, whether they are human or cylon. And that I think… particularly the role of Starbuck, I think, could be very very important role for young women. Because if they can start to get comfortable with someone like Starbuck, who basically is herself, you know, she just is, and let’s not make an issue from it. Then that’s a wonderful conditioning for this girls, who I fear at the moment are almost endangered by a kind of fashion anorexic version of what a woman is. And we are seeing all kinds of women in this particular show. And they are all pretty comfortable with who they are, you know, and I find that exiting.

Grace Park: I think it’s so exiting, to have so many strong female characters. Because we have so many. I mean, if you look at the population it’s pretty much half-half, fifty-fifty men and women. And so to have only… you previously just only male dominated. It showed one element of it. But right now is seems like the tides are changing, there is more female strength ether higher up, you name ether in government or military or business. And it adds another element, and that’s another dimension of relationships, which way they’re going, how do you deal with the sexuality of it, are we gender neutral, are we… We are not asexual, you know, we are both still sexual beings. And to add that in there just creates another sort of stir to the pie.

Tricia Helfer: Oh, I think that we have women in…in, you know, pivotal roles. It’s fantastic. It’s not normal science fiction. You know, in science fiction they are normally the eye-candy or whatever. It…again it reflects where we are in the world today. And it’s more real. You know, you have women over in Iraq, and you have… why not have women on a battlestar? In important roles.


Writing a Dark, Sexy, Political Sci-Fi Show

David Eick: Well, the initial impulse for re-imagining Battlestar Galactica actually came from Universal Television and Sci-Fi channel, who approached me and asked, if I’d be interested in taking the title and coming up with the different way into it. I was the fan of the original, but I also knew, that it represented an opportunity to do something different. Not just with the title, but with the genre.

Ronald D. Moore: I think, goal from very beginning on the redoing Battlestar Galactica, for me anyway, the only reason to do it, was to advance science fiction on television, to try and reinvent the genre, to take something which had become very sort of tired and sort of expected and become very cliché in all of its forms, and how science fiction was presented week after week at this day and age. And to really say “No, let’s try something different”.

David Eick: Why do another space opera? The world has plenty of them. They’ve done extraordinary well. The Sci-Fi channel itself airs some of them. If we are going to go back to that well, we better have a damn good reason. And I think that more than anything motivated us toward that place of going “OK, well, there is a lot of idealized science fiction, there is a lot of fantastical science fiction, is there a truly realistic approach to the genre?”

Mary McDonnell: My sensation is that… And my conversation with Ron is that the impulse to do that wasn’t the decision to be different. The impulse to do that was that he felt the story in a different way.

Edward James Olmos: You look for stories. You know, you are storytellers, so you look for stories to be involved in. And this story was very strong, very unique and very well-written.

Ronald D. Moore: There is now show unless you write it first. So it’s always about a sсript, and it’s always about getting the story right and getting the dialogue right and making sure characters are there on the page.

Michael Rymer: I’ve noticed in the new scripts, that Ron Moore will write to the rhythms of the actors now, you know. Which isn’t always a good thing. You know, actors can get into sort of tricks and bad habits. But, you know, everyone has their own personality, their own way of speaking.

Katee Sackhoff: And the writers have started to write characters in our speech patterns, like the way that we talk. Which is really interesting. So they are picking up on us as a person and adding that into the character, which is nice, makes it easier to memorize lines, because it’s the way that you talk.

Grace Park: The writers are really great, they do such wonderful work. And then if there is ether element, that we think, that’s been overlooked or that we are unsure of, they help us clarify that. We do have access to writers and producers, and they are so helpful. Because all of us want the great show.

Ronald D. Moore: It’s a tremendous cast. They have an extraordinary commitment to the material. They are very committed to their roles, they believe in what we are doing. They like the scripts, they embellish on them, they make up bits of business and stuff on their own, which just acts to the texture and the richness of what we do.

James Callis: It’s really great to be listened to. To have your concerns addressed. In many television shows the actors never speak to the director, writer or producer. They are some kind of strange invisible high rocky, and like we are not worthy or we are too stupid. I believe, all of us feel that we are part of the process. And that we are as much creating our roles as interpreting them.

Jamie Bamber: The thing about the show like this, is that nobody knows the characters as well as the actor portraying the character. And, you know, we know the whole story from this particular perspective and from no other perspective. So there is the reality there, that no matter, how good a writer you are, you can’t keep all these ball juggling, so sometimes it’s down to us to call the writer, call Ron or David and say “Listen, I just think the last time I saw Starbuck it was in this context, and I think there is room for may be something else in the scene.” At the very top of it I’m sure we can go there, with writing this down. We don’t need to be writing, but there need to be, you know, things like that. And they are by and large extremely receptive. But they are not afraid to say “Shut up, you’re wrong”

Tricia Helfer: You can call Ron, or speak to the director that’s doing it, or David and discuss it, and talk about it. And they want you happy, and they want you to feel comfortable with what you’re saying and doing. And so they’re very open.

James Callis: It’s a great opportunity for all of us to work with people, who care so much. And really have such great ideas. And I would also include Michael Rymer who was… who directed our first show, as somebody, who’s really steered this in to the century that we are in.

Mary McDonnell: See, I think, what’s really interesting about these guys… And I have to say Michael Rymer is a great part of that equation, because he cast the mini with them. But what’s really wonderful is that they wanted to and did cast really smart actors. Now that we can be such a pain in their you know what. And I’m sure we are. Because no one, not one actor in this group will let something slide. I think, that the ideas, that are the stress points in Battlestar Galactica are very familiar to us since September 11th. The fear of terrorism and its ramifications.

Jamie Bamber: There are elements in it, that are sort of lighthearted. And there is definitely humor. But this show is all about fear. It’s what it’s about.

David Eick: The show is dark, the show is intense, and the show is sexual. I believe that those are attitudes, that we haven’t seen in science fiction on television. Although we do see those very well represented in science fiction in movies and books and great graphic novels and so forth. So I don’t view those as antithetical to science fiction genre. They are very well represented in genre in other media. We just haven’t seen them on television, so I believe that it will work. I believe that it will actually flavor the science fiction drama in such a way that we haven’t seen. If it becomes too intense or too inappropriate for people, then we’ll fail. But I don’t think we will.

Ronald D. Moore: You know, the darker qualities of the show are embedded in the premise of the show. Show begins with the holocaust of the human race and focuses on the handful of survivors. By its nature it’s a dark show. Has elements [?] disturbing, and, you know, there is a constant sense of fear. And will our enemies catch us, so we all be wiped out. That will always be there. But it’s that very situation that allows the sort of stronger qualities of these people to come out.

David Eick: How is this going to be different? How is its… How at its utter guts is it going to be a change up, it’s going to be something unexpected? And as long as we keep asking that question, as long as we keep pushing in that direction then I think we got a job.



@темы: актёры, комментарии

URL
Комментарии
2010-07-25 в 19:56 

Наивно-оптимистичный сайлонский тормоз в ромашках
Women in Pivotal Roles

- Мэри рассказывает, что она подобной положительной реакции на сценарий БСГ от себя не ожидала. Но он дал ей возможность сыграть женщину-президента, а то до этого были роли вроде первой леди, но не было подобного лидера, с решительными действиями. К тому же, здесь нет стремления к лидерству, скорее судьба и необходимость принять власть, а не добиться её. Другой подход к эволюции лидерства, который её очень заинтриговал.
- Мур вспоминает, что оригинальная Галактика была очень "мужской", поэтому вполне логично, что одной из идей было добавить больше женских персонажей. Вот, например, Адама мужчина и лидер флота. Так как Мур хотел сыграть на противостоянии военного и гражданского, то вполне логично сделать президента ещё и женщиной.
- Джейми раздумывает, что такого Ли в президенте увидел. Скорее всего то, что она в основе своей очень сострадательный человек. И Ли, он полагает, видит в ней свою потерянную мать, которая была намного более эмоциональной, чем отец. В общем связь у Ли с президентом на эмоциональном уровне, но при этом, та может быть очень несгибаемой и принимать очень сложные решения.
- Мэри на этот раз рассуждает про женщин в Галактике вообще. Что там много людей и сайлонов, которые себя чувствуют на своём месте. И это очень хороший пример для подрастающего поколения девочек, которым в основном показывают тощих модниц. А тут есть, например, Старбак, которая такая, какая она есть, и давайте не будем заострять на этом внимание. И ещё множество разных женщин, которые удовлетворены тем, какие они.
- Грейс тоже радуется большому количеству сильных женских персонажей. Потому что в мире мужчин и женщин где-то поровну, а вот показывают обычно, почему-то мужчин, что довольно однобоко. Но сейчас женщин полно и в политике, и в армии, и в бизнесе. И это добавляет что-то дополнительное, новое измерение, например, в отношения, потому что никакой асексуальности не появилось, а что появилось надо разобраться.
- Триша утверждает, что женщины на основных ролях это для сай-фая не обычно. Обычно они там используются для красоты. Но подобный подход гораздо более реалистичен. Если сейчас есть женщины в Ираке, то почему их не может быть на баттлстаре? В важных ролях.

Writing a Dark, Sexy, Political Sci-Fi Show

- Эйк начинает с того, что изначально идея новой БСГ принадлежала Universal Television и каналу Sci-Fi, которые его спросили не хочет ли он взять старое и снять по новому. Он сам фанат оригинала, но ему понравилась идея нового не только в этом сериале, но и в жанре сайфая вообще.
- Мур полагает, что для него лично единственной причиной по которой он занялся БСГ было переизобретение жанра научной фантастики на телевидении. А то там сплошные клише, от которых сам жанр устал, и все знают, что на этой неделе ждать. А он решил сказать "нет, попробуем что-нибудь другое".
- Эйк подхватывает, что космических опер куча, с ними всё прекрасно, даже канал Sci-Fi их показывает. Так что если делать, то нужна какая-то причина. Идеализированной и фантастической научной фантастики много, так почему бы не подойти к жанру с реализмом.
- А вот Мэри с ними не согласна, она считает, что причиной у Мура было не желание сделать по другому, а то, что он историю чувствовал по другому.
- Эдди же сообщает, что как рассказчик историй всегда ищешь истории в которых поучаствовать, а эта оказалась сильной, уникальной и вообще хорошо написанной.
- Мур говорит, что перед тем как сериал будет, его нужно написать. И нужно что бы история и персонажи были на бумаге правильными.
- Раймер отмечает, что в последнее время Мур начал писать диалоги в ритме актёров. Что не всегда хорошо, ибо у актёров могут образоваться плохие привычки. Но у всех своя личность и манера разговора.
- Кэти тоже согласна, что диалоги начали писать, учитывая, как говорят актёры. Следят за ними и что-то добавляют в персонажей. И роль так намного проще учить.
- Грейс хвалит писателей и продюсеров за то, как они хорошо работают. И как к ним всегда можно подойти, если что-то не понятно, и они объяснят почему так. Потому что все хотят что бы получился отличный сериал.
- Мур в ответ хвалит каст, который удивительно предан работе и матерьялу, и который к сценарию добавляет различные свои мелочи, от которых сериал становится ещё богаче.
- Кэллис радуется, что здесь актёров слушают. А то во многих телевизионных сериалах режиссёры, сценаристы и продюсеры сидят где-то на вершине, куда обычным актёрам хода нет. А здесь они все часть процесса, идёт не только интерпретация, но и создание своей роли.
- Джейми рассказывает, что в подобных сериалах никто не знает своего персонажа лучше, чем актёр. Потому что тому нужно держать в голове историю только с одной перспективы, а сценаристам - со всех существующих. И последние при всём желании не могут абсолютно точно всё помнить. Поэтому иногда приходится актёрам звонить сценаристам, или Муру с Эйком и сообщать, что ввиду того-то и того-то здесь можно бы кое-что добавить. И замечательно, что те всегда готовы принять к сведению и откликнуться. И при этом не менее готовы сообщить, что уйди, ты не прав.
- Триша подтверждает, что всегда можно позвонить и обсудить и поговорить, потому что все хотят, что бы ты была счастлива и чувствовала себя со своими словами и действиями комфортно.
- Кэллис ещё раз радуется с какими замечательными людьми они работают и какие у людей замечательные идеи, и добавляет, что Майкла Раймера сюда тоже нужно включить, ибо с него всё началось.
- Мэри тоже Раймера включает, потому что он участвовал в кастинге в минисерии. А в результате кастинга выбрали очень умных актёров. Которые могут быть занозой все знают в чём и наверняка бывают. Потому что ни один актёр не подходит к делу спустя рукава. И добавляет, что идеи БСГ очень им всем знакомы после 11го сентября, страх терроризма и последствия.
- Джейми говорит, что юмор и беззаботность в сериале тоже есть, но в основе это сериал о страхе.
- Эйк подтверждает, что сериал тёмный, напряжённый и сексуальный. И на телевидении такого в научной фантастике не было. Но было в других формах, например в кино или книгах, так что научной фантастике эти особенности не противоречат. Поэтому он считает, что всё сработает, и на телевидении будет научно фантастическая драма, которой раньше не было. Если будет слишком напряжённо или неприлично для людей, то ничего, конечно, не получится, но он думает, что получится.
- Мур размышляет, что тёмные качества сериала заложены уже в самой предпосылке, где происходит уничтожение людской расы, а действие сосредотачивается на горстке выживших. Конечно это тёмный сериал, где постоянно присутствует чувство страха. А вдруг враги догонят и уничтожат. Оно постоянно будет присутствовать. Но эта же ситуация помогает проявиться наиболее сильным качествам этих людей.
- Эйк завершает, что нужно постоянно задаваться вопросом, что в самой сути будет по другому и неожиданно. Пока они движутся в этом направлении, работа у них будет.

URL
2010-07-25 в 21:21 

Poltavka
Натали. Упёртая зануда. Всем спаффям спаффь (с)
Так как Мур хотел сыграть на противостоянии военного и гражданского, то вполне логично сделать президента ещё и женщиной.

И этот человек еще уверяет, что не шиппер:)

И это очень хороший пример для подрастающего поколения девочек, которым в основном показывают тощих модниц.

Да-да, Триша - это, конечно, совсем не то:eyebrow:

например, Старбак, которая такая, какая она есть, и давайте не будем заострять на этом внимание. И ещё множество разных женщин, которые удовлетворены тем, какие они.

Правильно, не надо заострять внимание на словосочетании "Старбак" и "удовлетворены те, какие они":laugh:.

И Ли, он полагает, видит в ней свою потерянную мать, которая была намного более эмоциональной, чем отец.

Как интересно, разве Ли не жаловался на матушку? Если это, по его мнению, эмоциональность, то каким боком он такое мог увидеть в Лоре, вроде она его, наоборот, хвалила, сколько могла.

Джейми рассказывает, что в подобных сериалах никто не знает своего персонажа лучше, чем актёр. Потому что тому нужно держать в голове историю только с одной перспективы, а сценаристам - со всех существующих. И последние при всём желании не могут абсолютно точно всё помнить. Поэтому иногда приходится актёрам звонить сценаристам, или Муру с Эйком и сообщать, что ввиду того-то и того-то здесь можно бы кое-что добавить. И замечательно, что те всегда готовы принять к сведению и откликнуться. И при этом не менее готовы сообщить, что уйти, ты не прав.

Как-то он впоследствии, очевидно, не смог найти баланс между "слушали, слушали", а потом вдруг стало "уйди":eyebrow:.

2010-07-25 в 21:50 

Наивно-оптимистичный сайлонский тормоз в ромашках
И этот человек еще уверяет, что не шиппер
Не, он шиппер. Там ещё в "библии" было про seхual chemistry. Он просто слишком любит ангст.

Да-да, Триша - это, конечно, совсем не то
Триша это "не стойте слишком близко" :)

Правильно, не надо заострять внимание на словосочетании "Старбак" и "удовлетворены те, какие они"
Тут я тоже слегка недопоняла, но нет, всё правильно расслышала :nope:

Если это, по его мнению, эмоциональность, то каким боком он такое мог увидеть в Лоре, вроде она его, наоборот, хвалила, сколько могла.
А Лора была правильно эмоциональной? :) У КэролЭнн настроение менялось часто, а тут лишнее выкинули? Как раз дополучил то, что хотел?

Как-то он впоследствии, очевидно, не смог найти баланс между "слушали, слушали", а потом вдруг стало "уйди"
А потом сценаристы зазнались и стали нос воротить от любых предложений вообще? :eyebrow:

URL
   

Новокаприканская травка

главная